Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density

Urban.com.au is currently tracking 116 low-rise and mid-rise projects which are under construction right across Melbourne's metropolitan area. Together these projects will add a further 6800 units to the residential market and they are dispersed far and wide; in hot spots such as Brunswick, Richmond, Carlton and South Melbourne as well as more traditional suburban areas such as Blackburn, Box Hill, Sandringham, Preston and Carnegie.

The following represent an editor's pick of sorts - a way to remind ourselves that it's not just the CBD and Southbank that are seeing substantial change.

8 Montrose Street, Hawthorn East

Right next to Auburn station, 8 Montrose Street consists of 110 apartments on a 1,270sqm site in Hawthorn East. Developed by Kokoda Property, with design by CBG Architects, the 9 level building with also include 350sqm of ground floor commercial space.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
8 Montrose Street, Hawthorn East. Image © Kokoda Property

20 Queen Street, Blackburn

Blackburn, for many, will have flown well under the radar however this Hayball designed mid-rise is a stone's throw from Blackburn station in an area that is seeing a surprising amount of urban development. 20 Queen Street has 50 apartments.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
20 Queen Street, Blackburn. Image © Hayball

Twenty Park, Moonee Ponds

ClarkeHopkinsClarke have designed this low-rise located approximately 500 metres from Moonee Ponds station and CBD for developer Romano Property Group. The 4 level building contains 31 apartments in total with only two remaining for sale.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
20 Park Street, Moonee Ponds. Image © twentypark.com.au

Leroy, St Kilda

Leroy on Packington Street in St Kilda is a RotheLowman design for developer Urban Inc. It's located on a back street in a block surrounded by Public Transport on three sides and includes 85 units.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
Leroy - 40 Packington Street, St Kilda. Image © Urban Inc

FRD, Carnegie

This 5 level low-rise which abuts Carnegie station is an in-house design by developer Fridcorp. There are 40 dwellings under construction and the ground floor will contain a cafe.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
FRD - 2 Morton Avenue, Carnegie. Image © Fridcorp

District, Fitzroy

This 16 metre high, 5 level low-rise for Substancia Projects will be located one block back from Johnston Street in Fitzroy. Its eye-catching design makes it a favourite amongst Urban Melbournites.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
District - 160 Argyle Street, Fitzroy. Image © District Fitzroy

Aspire Maribyrnong

JMC Group's development on Wests Road is an 11 level mid-rise with a total unit count of 117. Interlandi Mantesso designed this project which is located right next to both the 57 and 82 tram lines.

Seven projects quietly increasing Melbourne's urban density
Aspire Maribyrnong - 62 Wests Rd, Maribyrnong. Image courtesy JMC Group

Lead image courtesy solsticeapartments.com.au

Alastair Taylor

Alastair Taylor

Alastair Taylor is a co-founder of Urban.com.au. Now a freelance writer, Alastair focuses on the intersection of public transport, public policy and related impacts on medium and high-density development.

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Laurence Dragomir's picture
That junction is somewhat clumsy - the new doesn't respond or engage with the heritage building.
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bilby
District, Fitzroy is not favourite with this Melbourne urbanite - the treatment of the heritage building is amateur, with poor setbacks, significant loss of historic fabric and loss of the roof form of the front of the building. It's facadism at its worst. Likewise, the new building is unresolved, with clunky Goldcoast style glass balconies that really don't respond well to the richly textured materiality of Fitzroy.
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