Cycling

Bicycles Network Australia's Christopher Jones discusses the future of cycle-culture in Australia
Bicycles Network Australia's Christopher Jones discusses the future of cycle-culture in Australia

Bicycles Network Australia's Christopher Jones discusses the future of cycle-culture in Australia

Choosing a commute that will boost your happiness, fitness and your bank balance seems like a logical option. However, avid cyclist, Christopher Jones believes...
We subsidise road and rail commuters - why not bikes too?
We subsidise road and rail commuters - why not bikes too?

We subsidise road and rail commuters - why not bikes too?

Australian governments heavily subsidise car, bus and train commuting, but not cycling. Yet a new survey shows many workers would consider riding to work if they got paid for it, and most would even support it if they didn’t participate, because of the wider benefits for cutting road congestion. The list of existing transport subsidies is long. Fuel tax receipts have fallen so low that they now fail to pay for road-building programs as they once did. Company car concessions remain one of the largest distortions in the Australian tax code and a severe hit to the federal budget.
Ride to work? You'll need a bike barrier for that
Ride to work? You'll need a bike barrier for that

Ride to work? You'll need a bike barrier for that

Between 1% and 3% of Australian commuters are out on the roads today proving cycling is often the fastest transport choice in Australian cities. Why don’t more people join them? It is not for a lack of interest. Australians have already stocked their households with an average of 1.6 bikes. The reason most of those bikes gather dust in garages is that few of us are prepared to risk our lives riding near cars, as Australian traffic and planning authorities expect us to do. Now even the US has decided to make it easier for cyclists. Will Australia ever catch up?