Ramifications of 'Super Tuesday'

Time to gaze into the crystal ball after yesterday's announcements concerning 'Super Tuesday'; or the approval of five residential towers through inner Melbourne.

Reading over the press release, much could be derived from the short few paragraphs which were provided. Here's my interpretation:

Backyard Blitz

Yesterday's release made reference to Plan Melbourne and reformed residential zones which protect established suburbs from high rise development.

I can't help but think that the certain council's implementation of this policy has left a few noses out of place on a state level. Expect some further announcements on this topic in coming weeks.

Having a bender

The first glimpse of justifying relaxed heights limits for Fishermans Bend may have been contained in yesterday's press release. "Melburnians have made it clear that they want their suburbs protected from high-rise apartment development. To achieve this we're delivering density in defined locations like Melbourne's CBD and Docklands - not in our quiet suburban streets."

Prediction: the above coupled with strong population growth will form the nucleus of the argument to relax height limits in Fishermans Bend. 40 level towers in four level zones may not eventuate, nor will they stay at 4 levels either.

Western World

If one development epitomises the change in decision-makers stance toward high-rise living it just might be 420 Spencer Street. The best part of eight years ago a squat development was proposed for the site, drawing disgust from local residents. Fast forward to yesterday's announcement and a 38 level, 131 metre tower with 438 apartments gains approval.

It sets a precedent for projects such as 371 Spencer Street nearby which are of a similar height. Will West Melbourne/Dudley become the next Southbank? Yes it will.

Super CBD

Unless it's proposed around the Parliament precinct, it'll likely to receive planning approval and at a substantial height. The suburbs are safeguarded but tall towers within Melbourne's CBD will become all the more common.

Good, bad or otherwise, the change and the rate at which it occurs for Melbourne's CBD over the next decade will be immense with at least a tripling of the number of 200 metre plus towers in the big smoke. Prediction: welcome to mega Melbourne.

5 comments

Nicholas Harrison's picture

I hope that one of the ramifications is not that the state opposition take a contrarian position and make it policy to introduce stricter height controls in the expanded Melbourne CBD area.

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Alastair Taylor's picture

^ +1

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Bilby's picture

Prediction: powerful down draughts from towers without podiums rising straight up off the street will soon make significant sections of upper Elizabeth Street very unpleasant / unlivable.

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Laurence Dragomir's picture

You know there are other design solutions to minimizing the effects of wind and down draughts beyond simply employing a traditional podium.

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Bilby's picture

Yes, there are other approaches to dealing with wind effects, however a podium provides other positives as well - in particular, providing a more human scale street wall and better solar penetration at ground level.

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