Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing
Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

A Penshurst, Sydney real estate agency has come under fire for using a digitally enhanced image (above) that seemingly removed a huge water tower from images that advertise a house for sale.

The 31A Penshurst Avenue, Penshurst offering has a huge water tower looming over the three bedroom property, yet just blue sky in the marketing.

But camera crews from the television stations worked out today that one spot in the front yard allowed photos that didn't contain the vast water tower in the image.

It was all about the mastery of the lens, not digital enhancing.

Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

The marketing had it only only visible in a rear garden shot (above).

The aww.com.au was told by the listing agent Jackie Li from Ray White Rockdale that he inherited the images of the renovated 1960s home from another agency.

But it seems the agent didn't advise the aww website that no digital photoshopping had been used.

Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

But he also didn't think they were deceptive or misleading.

“The photos were taken by a previous agent and given to us by the owner, who didn’t want to pay for new images to be taken,” he said.

“The address is available and most people will search for the property on Google maps, where the water tower is very obvious."

Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

(Pic courtesy of Google Maps)

NSW Fair Trading says under the Property, Stock and Business Agents Act 2002 it is an offence to publish, or allow to be published, any information in relation to the sale or lease of any property that is materially false, misleading or deceptive.

But strategic pics pass muster.

When it was sold for $600,000 in 2010 as a deceased estate, the water tower was evident in its marketing (pic below).

Water tower missing from Penshurst property marketing

It last sold at $780,000 in 2014.

Property Observer's initial story was based on the premise that there had been prior digital enhancement.

Jonathan Chancellor

Jonathan Chancellor

Jonathan Chancellor is one of our authors. Jonathan has been writing about property since the early 1980s and is editor-at-large of Property Observer.

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Fair Trading Penshurst

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