The 10 Sydney suburbs set to take off in 2016: Doug Driscoll

The 10 Sydney suburbs set to take off in 2016: Doug Driscoll
The 10 Sydney suburbs set to take off in 2016: Doug Driscoll

2016 will be the year that puts some Sydney suburbs on the map according to Douglas Driscoll, CEO of real estate agency Starr Partners.

Douglas predicted the top 10 suburbs set to take off in 2016:

1.  Leppington.  “More rezoning will occur throughout 2016 so Leppington will become popular for land sales.  Being south of Badgerys Creek, I anticipate it to be the next suburb to genuinely emerge.  It will be close enough to the new airport but far away enough from it that plane noise won’t be an issue.” The median price of a home in Leppington is $675,000, according to CoreLogic RP Data.

2.  St Marys.  “St Marys is one of the last great Sydney ‘true blue’ suburbs.  With the state government’s move to reserve a rail corridor there for a direct route to Badgerys Creek airport, it’s definitely one to watch. The suburb is already well-established, will become very well connected (and is already connected to the M4 and M7) and will be close yet just far away enough from the airport. And above all else, it’s affordable.” The median price of a home in St Marys is $555,000, according to CoreLogic RP Data.
 

3.  North Sydney.  “North Sydney is really going to take off in 2016. There is some redevelopment happening in the area presently and this, combined with the new metro train lines under construction and the second tunnel under Sydney Harbour, as well as the arrival of Coles and Woolworths, means it’s a real one to watch. Right now, North Sydney doesn’t have a firm identity, it’s not sure what it is or what it is supposed to be but I anticipate it will find its feet and form its own identity – it’s a nice area, close to the water and to the city. An honourable mention should also be made for the neighbouring suburb of Crows Nest, which is also earmarked for a new metro station.” The median price of a home in North Sydney is $1,726300, according to CoreLogic RP Data.

4.  Baulkham Hills.  “I predict that 2016 will be the year Baulkham Hills starts to emerge from the shadow of its neighbour, Castle Hill. With eight new train stations currently under construction around the area, it’s very much a convenient suburb and there is a lot of urban regeneration and redevelopment plans underway.  It’s more affordable than Castle Hill and has the potential to become as desirable.” The median price of a home in Baulkham Hills is $1,030,000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

5.  Auburn.  “Slowly but surely, Auburn will be absorbed into the Inner West. It’s the next major suburb along so it is inevitable that the suburb will start to fall more into that bracket.  Not only this, Auburn is a suburb that demonstrates good value. It’s also a great representation of modern Australia, being the most multicultural suburb in the country.”  The median price of a home in Auburn is $860,5000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

6.  Hornsby.  “Hornsby is a great area for families and professionals working in Sydney’s CBD. It has recently undergone significant redevelopment and improvement, including upgraded trains, which can get you into the city in 35 minutes. It is also surrounded by a lot of beautiful parks and countryside.” The median price of a home in Hornsby is $1,000,750 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

7. Camperdown.  “It’s almost unthinkable that Camperdown and its surrounding suburbs could become even more popular but expect it to happen in the next 12 months.  Ultimo is down the road and has the highest ratio of renters in Australia (95%), which will trickle down to areas like Camperdown, Chippendale and Newtown. What sets Camperdown apart is that it has a university and there is a strong case for a metro train interchange to be built there. Transport is one of the absolute factors driving property prices so things like improvements to public transport and motorway ramps make areas more desirable.” The median price of a home in Camperdown is $1,275,000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

8. Riverstone.  “Believe it or not, land is selling in Riverstone almost every day and next year, we will start seeing major new developments popping up.  A significant amount of work has been spent rezoning the area, and I really think it’s going to flourish in 2016. Neighbouring suburbs like Rouse Hill and Schofields have already been redeveloped but Riverstone is fresh, new, and on the doorstep of Marsden Park, the location of Sydney Business Park, a new commercial precinct with Ikea and Costco setting up shop, as well as Lindt moving its headquarters to the estate. This new business district will create hundreds of new jobs and we know that most people want to live within close proximity to work.” The median price of a home in Riverstone is $675,000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

9. Botany.  “Botany is a nice established location with a real diverse cross-section of properties. It’s a suburb that is ideal for families, a very convenient distance from the airport and only 11km away from the CBD. I think it’s certainly going to see some overspill from the rest of the Eastern Suburbs in 2016.”   The median price of a home in Botany is $1,15,000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

10. Dee Why.  “Dee Why is another suburb that has seen significant regeneration recently. It’s always been seen as the poor relation of the Northern Beaches but the town planners there have some great ideas for the area and are very forward thinking. Pricewise, Dee Why is so much more affordable than Manly down the road and other affluent beach suburbs near the north and I can guarantee it will become its own little epicentre soon enough. Dee Why’s main drag is going to get a bit of a facelift, new properties have been approved, and the traffic flow has been changed to accommodate more residents. It’s so much more than you think.”  The median price of a home in Botany is $1,411,000 according to CoreLogic RP Data.

DOUGLAS DRISCOLL is CEO of real estate agency Starr Partners.

Tags: 
Property market Residential Sale

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