How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages

How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages
How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages

You may have seen by now that we have brand new suburb module pages, which anyone looking to invest should find a great place to start when researching property investment this weekend. Located in our 'Finding' section's 'Suburb Data' page, or through this link, each suburb is provided with a number of useful information that will help kickstart your research.

You can also find the suburb search module throughout the site, for whenever you need quick information on an area you're considering or comparing.

Suburb map

The first thing you'll find on each page is a map of the suburb. These maps not only quickly locate where the suburb is in conjunction to other local areas, but it also allows you to see nearby train lines, and to click through to Google Maps to explore the area further.

While walking through a suburb can reveal some crucial information, an online map search can quickly put you in a good position in advance. If you're in the assessing an area part of the process, you'll also want to understand how important street selection can be.

How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages 

House and unit data

It is this module, powered by RP Data, that provides you with all the latest house and unit data - including graphs you can scan your cursor across for more date-specific information.These graphs include price data, rental data and market trends - the average time on market correlated with the average hold period.

Median prices can be incredibly useful when undertaking your due diligence, but make sure you know exactly what it means. If you haven't dealt with medians much before, or you want a refresher, then here's how the median price is calculated.

You may also want to read these four things you need to know about medians.

 How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages

Demographic data

We then have the demographic information powered by the 2011 Census data. This includes household composition, landlord type, ownership type, employment and a number of other useful aspects about who is living in your target suburb.

How and what you look for when using demographic data can vary from person to person. Investors Choice's Jane Slack-Smith explained her approach to this data previously.

We're always open to new ideas on what data you'd like to get your hands on. Is there anything else you'd like to see in these suburb data pages?

 How to use Property Observer's suburb data pages

Jennifer Duke

Jennifer Duke

Jennifer Duke was a property writer at Property Observer

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