6 posts in this thread / 0 new
Last post

Former Royal Mint

Peter Maltezos's picture
#1

Text from Walking Melbourne

The National Trust Guide to The Historic and Architectural Landmarks of Central Melbourne.

Former Royal Mint

280 – 318 William Street

 

Constructed in 1872, and designed by JJ Clark, this is considered one of the finest examples of Renaissance Revival in Australia. Freestanding on its site, the building is finely detailed, and the elegantly proportioned first floor, with its paired ionic columns, is reputedly inspired by Bramante’s Palazzo Caprini (c1505).  The complex, with corner guardhouses and perimeter wall, once included a Coining Hall, Melting and Assay Departments to the rear, unfortunately demolished in 1968.  It was originally a branch of the Royal Mint, London, and minted only gold sovereigns until 1916, and then all Australian coins from 1927 to 1967.  Long the home of the marriage Registry and the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, it has been leased to the private sector since 2001.

 

 

Above, as it was, and below, several recent photographs I have taken of the old Royal Mint.

 

Below, we see the coin released to commemorate the mint’s 130th anniversary.

Back to top
Nicholas Harrison's picture
#2

There is room for a very big tower on the carpark behind the remaining Mint buildings :-)

Back to top
Chris Peska's picture
#3

ooooooooooooooooooo yeah.... hopefully it will block the western aspect of La Banque in the process... that's a shocker of a tower.

Observe. Design. Build. Live.

Back to top
Peter Maltezos's picture
#4

Edwardian Postcard of the Melbourne Royal Mint.

The first Melbourne Exhibition Building that used to stand on the mint’s site.

The former Mint’s main function is now as the Hellenic Museum.

The coat of arms on top of the portico.

Main entrance of the administration building, now Hellenic Museum.

The stairwell.

The main exhibition space in the Hellenic Museum.

I collect, therefore I am. thecollectormm.com.au
Back to top
Peter Maltezos's picture
#5

The Royal Melbourne Mint was authorized from the start to strike full British gold sovereign and half sovereign denominations, with the mintmark M to designate their Melbourne mintage. The first gold coins were struck in Melbourne in 1872 and were minted until 1931.

 

A half sovereign from 1887. Mintmark M can be seen between the two eights at the bottom of the shield.

A sovereign from 1886. Mintmark M can be seen at the bottom of young Queen Victoria’s neck.

A King Edward VII sovereign with mintmark M just above the zero in 1904.

I collect, therefore I am. thecollectormm.com.au
Back to top
Peter Maltezos's picture
#6
I collect, therefore I am. thecollectormm.com.au
Back to top