Error message

Warning: array_flip(): Can only flip STRING and INTEGER values! in EntityAPIController->load() (line 219 of /srv/www/drupal7/sites/all/modules/entity/includes/entity.controller.inc).
301 posts in this thread / 0 new
Last post

Pages

Mark Baljak's picture
#77

250 Gore St has been nominated for approval

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
3000's picture
#78

Was down this way recently and I am a bit concerned with some of the outcomes for this area. Some are extremely well done, others are just kind of meh; bulking up the area with poor setbacks and activation.
I feel like the whole idea of this area is an old, gritty feel that suits Melbourne.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#79

The render shown hasn't been approved in this form. Council has specified requirements for greater setbacks to the top level on the north side and to the east where the building transitions to Glenlouse Terrace (shown above). Also, the depth of the mansard roof cladding has been increased by another floor to make the top of the building appear more visually recessive when viewed in its heritage context. I'm not sure how the developer feels about these changes, though - it may yet end up at VCAT. Certainly local residents are disappointed by the council's failure to challenge the demolition of the Contributory heritage listed Edwardian house currently standing on the site next to Glenlouse Terrace, not to mention the loss of an important part of the Ackman's Emporium complex (the historic 1920s warehouse on the north side of the site on Hodgson Street).

Back to top
Nicholas Harrison's picture
#80

The developer has submitted amended plans generally in accordance with the changes that Council required.

The warehouse on the site is unremarkable and extensively modified. The detached Edwardian dwelling can almost be considered out of character surrounded by double storey Victorian terraces and large commercial buildings. In itself it is also unremarkable and similar to hundreds of Edwardian dwellings across Melbourne.

Overall this development will be a much better outcome than the hodge-podge of buildings on the site at the moment.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#81

Nicholas, you demonstrate little understanding of Fitzroy's heritage, or the purpose of the South Fitzroy heritage overlay in this area. It specifically references the mixed Victorian and Edwardian nature of the streetscapes, as well as the importance of the industrial heritage of the area and historic emporia on nearby Smith Street.

You are factually wrong with regard to the Edwardian house here, also. It is in an immediate context of mixed Victorian and Edwardian houses - there are in fact four Edwardian dwellings just metres away on Gore Street, for example.

Secondly, it is not "unremarkable and similar to hundreds of Edwardian dwellings across Mebourne". The house is well known in the local area as being rather remarkable for its unusual combination of Edwardian and very early Californian Bungalow features - find another one and post it here - I would be very interested to see a comparable building elsewhere in Melbourne.

And lastly, the warehouse on Hodgson St. is an important remaining piece of the Ackman's precinct. If a coat of paint and loss of original factory windows makes it "extensively" modified, then ok - but otherwise, it is completely intact and would make a stunning restored building in the streetscape. Across the way on the corner of Hargreaves and St. David Street we have an almost identical Ackman's building - if it had been overpainted years ago, would you recommend its demolition also?

http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/100818
FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Danny Boy's picture
#82

My oh my, what a stunning looking historical building. What a shame if it were to be demolished.

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Nicholas Harrison's picture
#83

The former Ackman’s warehouse on the Hodgson Street cannot be said to be intact according to its original construction. All of the original windows have been removed, the first floor pedestrian gantry connecting to a building over Hodgson Street has been removed and other modifications have occurred over time.

This building was part of a precinct of buildings designed by Mr Gawler, and other buildings that were built for and used by Ackman’s. However, this building, in its highly modified form, does not assist one to appreciate the grouping of either Gawler designed buildings or Ackman’s used buildings in this precinct. This is due to its modified form, as well as the inherent differences between this building and the others that have been retained.

The dwelling at 221 Moor Street is a plain example of late Edwardian architecture that is presently overwhelmed in a streetscape view by the Victorian terraces to its east and a more modern office building to its west. Since the Edwardian period and the period that the Californian Bungalow style was in fashion overlapped houses showing some elements of both styles is not uncommon at all. It is a rather dull, generic dwelling of it's type and age.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#84

A nice quote from the developer's heritage consultant, Nicholas - one of the most notorious in the business. And by the way, thanks for the history less on Ackman's - you're paraphrasing the developer's consultant, who is paraphrasing me - I helped to do the initial research for this, and stumbled on the Ackman's / Gawler & Drummond connection where council and previous heritage studies had missed it. I have also sighted a letter (addressed to another local researcher) from a reputable heritage consultant and from one of the original authors of the Northern Suburbs Factory Study on the matter - interestingly, although council were in possession of this letter, they didn't quote from it or make reference to it in a direct way. At the time of writing the author was employed as an expert at Museum Victoria. Here is a quote from it:

" ... Thank you very much for providing a copy of your research relating to the former Ackmans and Dowd factory on Hodgson Street, Fitzroy.
I feel confident that if _____ and I had the benefit of this information twenty years ago when we were doing the Northern Suburbs Factory Study, we would certainly have included the site in our citations and made recommendations for its protection under the local government Planning Scheme. Possibly the reason why we overlooked the site was that preliminary investigations suggested a date of around 1940 and the cut-off date for our study was factories built by 1930.

I feel that the site and in particular its Hodgson and Gore Street facade make a significant contribution to Fitzroy’s diverse industrial heritage.

The site is of particular importance because together with Ackman’s upholstery factory on the corner of St David & Hargreaves Streets, the two factories neatly ‘bookend’ the central retail and warehousing hub of the Ackman empire that once filled the block bounded by Smith, St David, Gore and Hodgson Streets. The close proximity of retailing and manufacturing activities is a significant characteristic of the industrial development of Fitzroy and Collingwood during the first half of the 20th century and one that is rarely reflected by commercial activities in these suburbs today.

Stylistically the buildings at 7-19 Hodgson Street reflect several features of J.S. Gawler’s other designs for Ackmans in the same precinct including the former Ackmans’ upholstery factory on the corner of St David & Hargeaves Street, and the motor garage nearby in Gore Street. Together the buildings represent both the physical ‘footprint’ of Ackmans furniture manufacturing and retailing enterprise at its peak in the 1920s and 1930s, and one of the most important concentrations of Gawler’s commercial work for a firm noted in Miles Lewis’s ADB entry* as Gawler’s “largest client” in the period after 1918."

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#85

And Riddlz, you are again displaying your failure to grasp the complexities of heritage here. The two buildings you have photographed and published above are the Dowd Corsets building (c. 1940s) - later Hickory, and a 1980s tilt slab warehouse of zero heritage interest. The Ackman's building is a separate structure built in the early 1920s around the corner on Hodgson Street (it is the one referred to in the Museum Victoria letter above). If you look closely at it from the street, you can see that the curved brickwork reveals, window lintel details, pilasters and some other details are almost identical in style and execution to the red brick Ackman's warehouse I posted. You may need a bit more imagination to be able to "see" it stripped of the coat of stipple paint, however.

Back to top
Danny Boy's picture
#86

And you fail to grasp the complexities of sarcasm.

I was making light of the fact that the site is a ugly mash of various types of demo-worthy buildings.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#87

Your comments are made lightly, Riddlz, but they contribute to a general attitude of careless indifference to history and culture in Melbourne's development scene at present. You are simply incorrect about the significance of these buildings in their context in Fitzroy. The Edwardian house is heritage listed and sits firmly in the South Fitzroy heritage overlay. To declare it "demo worthy" is ignorant in the extreme, and merely compounds problems that our most significant heritage precincts are facing right now.

As for the Ackman's and Dowd factories, it's true that they were not picked up in the original 1979 Northern Suburbs Factory study - an error now acknowledged in writing by the authors of that study at the Melbourne Museum. I also have a letter from an independent heritage consultant similarly stating that the significance of these buildings in the Ackman's precinct should now be recognised based on the new information that has come to light.

On the side of "ok to demolish" we have the developers own consultant and the council's consultant (who disagreed with the demolition of the house, and agreed that since the factories were unlisted and had no signage associated with Ackmans, that they could go).

So, if the most independent of the experts are recommending upgraded listing and retention of these buildings, and the developer and council are recommending to not retain, who would you trust as the most impartial in this instance?

For my money, given that the Ackmans factory is part of a concentrated cluster of contributory and individually significant Ackmans buildings, it is a no brainer that the façade at least should have been retained. Likewise, in terms of the Hodgson Street streetscape, a retained red brick façade with restored factory windows (based on the original designs still in evidence on St. David street across the way) would have made a fantastic contribution to the liveability of the immediate street level environs.

The fact that the windows were removed at some point in the '80s is to miss the point about retaining industrial heritage - and in many cases, where industrial buildings are retained, the steel or timber windows are re-created anyway (e.g. the nearby Yorkshire Brewery development had all of its original windows remade by Steptoes and Son in Collingwood). So, to say that the building is "heavily modified" because it lacks its original factory windows is irrelevant in the context of the building being redeveloped or adaptively reused. And likewise, to complain that the building is "ugly" assumes that paint cannot be stripped from a red brick façade. Do you think that the buildings on the corner of Hargreaves and St. David Street are "ugly"? Look closely, and you will find that they are almost identical to the one on Hodgson Street, with the only difference being a coat of paint and window frames - both aspects of old buildings that would be part of any typical restoration in an adaptive reused project.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#88

Here's another extract from a letter by another independent heritage consultant on these factories, requested by an acquaintance and local research also involved in tracing the story of these buildings:

SIGNIFICANCE OF FORMER ACKMAN’S FACTORY BUILDING, Hodgson St., Fitzroy AND FORMER DOWD’S CORSET FACTORY, cnr. Hodgson and Gore Sts, Fitzroy (now Units 1-3/250 Gore St.)

On 15 November you requested my opinion on the architectural and historical significance of the above building to HO334 (South Fitzroy heritage precinct).
After inspecting the buildings and reviewing your historical information and the Gawler and Drummond plans dated 1919-1941, I believe the building is of historical significance to the South Fitzroy precinct as a major surviving part of the Ackman’s commercial and industrial complex in this part of South Fitzroy.
Historical significance

The Ackman’s home furnishings manufacturing and retail empire in Fitzroy was centred around its Smith St. emporium which by 1915 had developed as the 50 metre wide (approx) neo-classical façade surviving as a remnant landmark. By 1924 Ackman’s factories and infrastructure extended over the entire block of Smith, Hodgson, Gore and St. David Sts. (now Woolworth’s) and into the adjacent streets. It was one of the important 19th C and interwar industries in the South Fitzroy area, comparable to the MacRobertson sweets/chocolate empire, which established many industrial building complexes nearby (known as the ‘White City”), and the Foy and Gibson clothing and bootmaking factories and stores. Smith St was known as the centre of Melbourne’s household furnishing stores with Ackman’s – complete home furnishers, described as “the Georges of Smith Street”. (Cutten History Committee, Fitzroy, Melbourne’s First Suburb, 1989)

Remaining industrial buildings from the Ackman empire (coloured) include the Gawler and Drummond designed factory complexes on St. David/Hargreaves Sts (erected in stages between 1917 and 1933), the factory/garage/residence on the north-wast corner of Gore and Hodgson Sts. (erected in three stages 1917-19). Both are listed as individually significant in the 2007 Yarra heritage data base.

The subject building (Ackman factory) on the south side of Hodgson St. was designed by Gawler and Drummond erected in stages from 1919 to 1924, and the façade further extended to Gore St in 1941, to their design, which retained the main 1924 entrance in Hodgson St., and treated the Gore St. aspect of the extension as a side elevation.

This is the largest of the three Ackman factories surrounding the Coles block. As a group of similar and closely located industrial buildings, they demonstrate the early 20th. century development of a major industry that contributes to the historical character and significance of the area.

The Yarra heritage data base does not recognise the subject building as contributory. I believe that given the new historical and documentary evidence you have collected on the Ackman provenance of the building and the involvement of the prominent architects Gawler and Drummond, the building certainly has historical, if not architectural significance.

The statement of significance “Why is it significant’ for the South Fitzroy precinct (HO 334) cites ‘well preserved inter-war residential, commercial, retail and industrial buildings that contribute to the historical character of the area’, and ‘the landmark qualities of some large factory and warehouse buildings’

The subject building is a large early-mid 20th century factory and a prominent feature of Hodgson and Gore Sts. It therefore fits the definition of ‘Contributory to the identified cultural values of the heritage overlay area as stated in the Statement of Significance.
Well –preserved?
All the Ackman’s factories employ red brickwork and display the same or similar distinctive detailing that set them apart from other contributory and significant industrial buildings in the precinct.
• Window and door openings with exposed, architecturally expressed structural lintels and with a bullnosed brick header course above
• The horizontal division of windows into three parts with hopper window sashes above and below an area of fixed glazing within fine glazing bars.

When the main part of the subject building was completed in 1924, the ground level of the façade was rendered in ’white cement’ as were the three entrance projections and their upper hoods, and the parapet was finished with an expressed rendered band. The upper walls were red face brickwork, now overpainted.
The architectural integrity of the building, compared with the two nearby ‘individually significant’ Ackman’s factories, is not as high, largely due to the removal of the timber window detail (mullions, transoms, glazing bars etc.) It should be noted that the original timber window frames remain in situ and all display physical evidence of the two removed transoms on the sides of the frames, while the heads and sills retain marks of the removed central mullions. Apart from the overpainting of the upper red brick walls and the loss of its window detailing, the building is relatively intact and retains all its window and door openings and original detailing, including its ground floor steel security grilles. If the paint was removed from the upper walls (or the walls repainted to match red brick) the building would regain a good sense of its 1924 appearance.

It should be noted that most of the window fenestration in the St David/Hargreaves St factory is modern metal replicas of the original timber windows. This type of reconstruction is therefore possible on the subject building, which would return its overall original appearance.

Yours faithfully, ________________

Back to top
johnproctor's picture
#89

Sorry bilby but I go past this site at least once a week and I don't think anyone will lose any sleep over it being gone. Would I have incorporated it into a development I was funding - Maybe/probably but there is no reason for this developer to have done so under the scheme.

Again blame council for not continually updating their heritage overlays if you don't like it.

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#90

Sure, blame council. Or get educated and learn something about the history and heritage of your local community and take action yourself - council isn't going to fix this off their own bat - they actually need community involvement for things to change.

Oh, and plenty of local residents will be losing sleep over this - less so over the fact that some people don't "like" the historic buildings on the site. This is Fitzroy - not Facebook.

Back to top
Melbourne_Fragments's picture
#91

I think you must have a somewhat lacking imagination not to see how retaining at least the Hodgson St facade is a no brainer. the cornices are all intact, and you can even see bits where the cement render has fallen off to reveal red brickwork. imagine the whole facade like that, with more sensitive window panes, and it's value as heritage would be a no brainer. Something else I'm sure we'll lose is all that greenery behind, is there no place for rusticism anymore?

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Adam Ford's picture
#92

"all of the original windows have been removed, the first floor pedestrian gantry connecting to a building over Hodgson Street has been removed and other modifications have occurred over time."

You're honestly putting that forward, without any sense of shame, as significant alterations that warrant demolition? There's barely a pre-war industrial building in this entire city that wouldn't have had significant alterations to the windows. Let's demolish all of those pre-emptively!

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#93

Here is a comparison of the window reveals from St. David Street Ackmans factory and Hodgson Street - close examination shows an identical steel lintel with curved header bricks and narrow brick posts. This wouldn't be a difficult restoration - it would simply require matching of the steel window design on St. David Street (or original timber design on Hargreaves) and placing an order with a manufacturer like Skyrange or Steel Design in Prahran. The render can simply be knocked off and the English bond brickwork should look pretty sharp, by the looks of it. Some minor brick repairs around the rusted security bars, and hey presto - one fantastic 1920s red brick Ackmans building returns to grace the gritty side streets of Fitzroy. Still think it's a great idea to demolish?
FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects
FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Peter Maltezos's picture
#94

http://www.premier.vic.gov.au/federal-government-urged-to-support-new-me...

Federal Government Urged To Support New Medical Research Centre

Monday 17 August 2015

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | ProjectsRendering of the proposed the Aikenhead Centre for Medical Discovery (ACMD), which will be built at the old St Vincent's Hospital site, north-east corner of Victoria Parade and Nicholson Street, Fitzroy.

The Andrews Labor Government has repeated its call for the Federal Government to contribute $60 million towards the establishment of the $180 million Aikenhead Centre for Medical Discovery.

The Aikenhead Centre for Medical Discovery will be Australia’s first research and education centre for biomedical engineering, bringing together doctors, scientists and researchers at one of Victoria’s leading hospitals.

The Centre will focus on chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer and diabetes, and advance cutting-edge treatments and technologies, including robotic hands, heart tissue engineering and spinal cord repair.

One example of a project being undertaken by the Centre is a world-first procedure to build a man a new heel bone using 3D printing, which will save him from losing part of his leg to cancer.

ACMD website:

http://acmd.org.au/

Rendering of foyer with Carlton Gardens opposite:

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

 

I collect, therefore I am. thecollectormm.com.au

Back to top
Melbourne_Fragments's picture
#95

Unfortunately dumbed down since the last design
FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture
#96

^^ That would explain the demolition onsite.

Construction tender is also out for Lyric
FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Nicholas Harrison's picture
#97

Spanish Club proposal by Gurner:

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture
#98

surely not a copy and paste of 28 stanley street?

FITZROY + FITZROY NORTH | 3065 + 3068 | Projects

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#99

Yep. Copy and paste it is. What a sympathetic site specific response, then.

Back to top
Mark Baljak's picture
#100

The inference was it's merely an indicative design. What were you expecting behind the retained facade?

Back to top
Bilby's picture
#101

I was expecting something a little more original and visionary for this site.

Back to top

Pages