House and land market could shift in to under-supply: Read Stockland CEO Mark Steinert's insights

Mark Steinert, the boss of the country’s largest residential developer, Stockland, suggests 2025 could see “quite a chronic under-supply in the land market.” 

House and land market could shift in to under-supply: Read Stockland CEO Mark Steinert's insights
House and land market could shift in to under-supply: Read Stockland CEO Mark Steinert's insights

The departing Stockland boss anticipates that the housing market could shift into under-supply in residential growth corridors around the capital cities over coming years.

Mark Steinert, the boss of the country’s largest residential developer, Stockland, suggests 2025 could see “quite a chronic under-supply in the land market.” 

“We need to make sure that, particularly on the eastern seaboard, planning and the delivery of infrastructure can align to ensure that under-supply doesn’t become too great,” he told The Australian.

“That’s going to reignite the whole challenge around affordability again just when it got to a point where that could actually be addressed.”

Buoyed by the federal government’s HomeBuilder incentives, Stockland’s ASX results announcement advised its strongest market was Sydney, followed by southeast Queensland. The company advised its settlement default rate had returned to normalised levels.

With strong January sales, the price secured per sqm rose significantly annually in NSW from $940 psqm to $1139, with the average lot price rising from $412,000 to $461,000.

House and land market could shift in to under-supply: Read Stockland CEO Mark Steinert's insights
House and land market could shift in to under-supply: Read Stockland CEO Mark Steinert's insights

“Melbourne continues to be solid, but has obviously been a bit more impacted by both the combination of the lockdowns, and the greater availability of land,” Mr Steinert said.

He anticipates Perth could moderate over the next 12 months as WA had the largest housing grants, pulling forward demand, although the strong mining sector could keep up its momentum.

Stockland’s buyers are mostly owner occupiers.

“We’ll move to equilibrium in 2022, and then move back into quite a significant under-supply as migration and foreign student numbers start to pick up in 2022,” Mr Steinert forecast.

Stockland had five new subdivision acquisitions, dubbed early cycle restocking, with the potential of adding 9,200 lots to its inventory.

Its residential business reported its strongest half year results in four years with more than 3800 sales, along with residential settlements jumping 43 per cent to 3,100.

Stockland is on track for 6000 settlements this financial year.

 

Jonathan Chancellor

Jonathan Chancellor

Jonathan Chancellor is one of our authors. Jonathan has been writing about property since the early 1980s and is editor-at-large of Property Observer.

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Stockland Housing Developer

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